Braw! At Craigmillar Castle

Wedding in Scotland

Braw! At Craigmillar Castle


 

Today’s guest blog is from Andrea Taylor – Soulful Celebrant!

I walk through Craigmillar Castle Park to and from work in Little France regularly and I love it. The woodland paths and parkland around Craigmillar Castle are peaceful and magical with a quiet sense of the history and spirit that it is steeped in. The castle itself, dating back to the early 14thcentury, sits radiant atop a rocky 9 metre precipice and retains the peaceful air of the rural retreat it was known as in 1560’s when Edinburgh nobility, and even Mary Queen of Scots, sought haven here.

Known as Edinburgh’s ‘other castle’ it is thought by some to be the best example of a medieval castle surviving in Scotland. The Preston family, and successive generations built, and then added onto, the Tower House until it was sold to Sir John Gilmour in the 17thcentury. In this beautifully preserved, ruined stronghold we find an amalgam of architectural styles soaked in a long history.

I have visited this castle many times and my children have fond memories of exploring the many winding staircases leading to a variety of chambers and halls, clambering to the top of the tower, having birthday picnics in the grounds and running between the two yew trees that frame the entrance to the courtyard. It is thought that the trees were planted in honour of Mary, during one of her residencies.

From the top of the tower you can take in wonderful views of Edinburgh’s Old Town skyline, the Pentland Hills, the Firth of Forth and over to Fife. Also you can see the area that became known as Petite France (Little France) named by locals after Mary Queen of Scots’ mainly French entourage, who would camp half a mile away in the valley below the castle when she was in residence. The fact that locals gave the area this name may highlight how frequent and lengthy her visits were.

Directly across from Craigmillar Castle you can see it’s big cousin, Edinburgh Castle. I heard a lot of stories about the Scottish Queen as a child and I still like to imagine Mary, Queen of Scots and her courtiers travelling through the then rural landscape of fields, woods and parkland between the two castles on horseback, in carriages and on foot.

This site has such a rich history yet it is the least visited tourist site in Edinburgh.  This does make me sad but when it comes to ceremony this tranquil, unhurried space offers such wonderful potential to couples and families who can create ceremony and ritual that captures its mood, thus beginning to weave its history, and their story, together.

With permission very small ceremonies or elopements could take place anywhere in the grounds but The Great Hall can host a ceremony for around 60 people. It is a majestic, yet somewhat intimate space accessed via a spiral staircase.  The hall, in all its stone and vaulted ceiling glory, can be softened with a red carpet and candlelight but today, that wasn’t needed because what caught my attention was the quality of the luminous winter light that shone into the hall.

That soft, ambrosial light that winter brings to Scotland followed us throughout our visit today just as the friendly resident cat did!

To find out more about Soulful Celebrant please visit: www.soulfulspace.org

To visit Historic Scotland please visit: historicenvironment.scot

Have a BRAW week! 

 

 

 

 

 

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